Environmental Sustainability Initiatives

2016

  • The Authority became a Silver Partner in the NSW Government’s Sustainability Advantage Program, having been a Bronze Partner since 2011.
  • Sydney Olympic Park Authority was awarded a certificate of commendation from leading industry body Australian Lands and Groundwater Association for its strategic sustainable management of leachate. The commendation recognised sustainability in remediation and high quality remediation planning and practice. The Authority’s implementation of local sustainable leachate treatment systems has significantly reduced its dependency on off-site leachate processing, delivering a better environmental outcome and a more cost-effective result.
  • The Sydney Olympic Park Aquatic Centre received the Roejen Environmental Sustainability Award from the Aquatic and Recreation Institute, for its high standard of environmental performance in the areas of energy efficiency, water efficiency, waste reduction, new technologies and sustainability practices for procurement.
  • The Authority’s ‘Recycled Water Quality Management Plan and assessment of WRAMS Operations’ was endorsed by NSW Health
  • Replacement of old fluorescent lights in P1 Car Park with energy efficient, low-maintenance LED luminaires. 807 new LED luminaires (resulting in a total of 1,847 installed to date) and 212 new LED emergency lights, were installed in 2015-16.
  • Under the NSW Energy Savings Scheme governed by NSW legislation and administered by IPART, SOPA became eligible to create 5,800 Energy Saving Certificates (ESC’s) resulting from energy and carbon emission savings at P1 Car Park.  Effectively these ESC’s were sold in June 2016 and SOPA received income of $171,000.
  • Construction of a new leachate treatment wetland at the former Golf Driving Range Landfill was completed in June 2015. The system uses natural wetlands to treat leachate on site and reuses the treated water for irrigation of plantings back over the landfill. A 12 month establishment phase ended in June 2016 and proof of performance testing commenced in July 2016.
  • Over 200 hectares of ecologically-sensitive land was managed by bush regeneration contractors, investing 13,900 hours of works. A total of 30,906 plants (7,608 shrubs, 23,298 groundcovers, grasses, sedges and vines) were installed, including 12,486 local provenance plants.  560 kg of Alligator Weed and 1,360kg of Pampas flower stalks were removed in ongoing noxious weed management programs.
  • Conservation Volunteers Australia partnered with the Authority in delivering a conservation volunteering program at the Park during the first six months of 2016.  This pilot program provided a new way for the community to connect with the Park - 312 community and corporate volunteers participated in activities including bush regeneration, litter collection and guided interpretive walks.  Over 5000 native plants were installed, 1,052 kg of litter was collected and weeding was conducted over 1,262m2 of wildlife habitat.
  • Newly-developed science programs at the Waterbird Refuge were delivered to over 700 primary and secondary students from seven schools.The Authority co-hosted a one-day regional Bushcare forum in partnership with Greater Sydney Local Land Services, attended by 120 community bush regenerators.
  • Dawn Fraser Avenue extension was completed. Water Sensitive Urban Design elements have been incorporated into roadway design, including a stormwater interceptor system and bio-treatment swales along Bennelong Road. Recycled material used in construction included 750 tonnes of Enviro sand for stormwater pipe bedding and 1,200 tonnes of unbound base for pavement.

2015

  • Ornamental fountain operations have been adjusted to better account for public visitation and activity levels, with resultant energy savings estimated at 522,395 kilowatts hours per year.
  • Old T8 fluorescent lights on levels 2 and 3 of P1 car park have been replaced with 1,040 new LED luminaires, with an estimated annual energy saving of 278,098 kilowatt hours.  
  • New bioswales were installed in the Parkview Precinct to treat stormwater run-off generated by newly-constructed roads, prior to its discharge to the wetlands of Badu Mangroves. 
  • 1,500 square metres of tri-hex paving was salvaged during construction of Netball Central and reused at the entry plaza and colonnade areas, resulting in cost savings and savings of embodied energy/transport emissions by using salvaged pavers.
  • 31 Hoop Pines and 16 Livistona Palms were re-transplanted onto the Netball Central site over the course of the project. A further 4 Livistona Palms were replanted off site. 
  • 200 hectares of ecologically-sensitive land was managed by contractors with bush regeneration qualifications and expertise, with 14,900 hours of works conducted in various habitats. 25,957 new habitat plantings were installed in natural areas, including Kronos Hill, Narawang Wetland, River Walk, and Wentworth Common. 
  • A new landscape enhancement strategy was initiated at Little Kronos Hill to create a structurally complex woodland habitat suited to small woodland birds. Existing densely-planted eucalypts were thinned to create space for new plantings of shrubs, grasses and groundcovers. Felled trees were piled to provide shelter for ground fauna such as reptiles. Tree hollows were cut into four retained habitat trees to provide breeding sites for birds and microbats.
  • The banks of a constructed island in Lake Belvedere were rehabilitated to halt erosion impacts and maintain the island as an important roost site for waterbirds.  
  • New screened observation stations were installed at the Waterbird Refuge, enabling greater levels of visitation

2014

  • A new cogeneration plant was installed at the Aquatic Centre.  The plant is comprised of two 260 kilowatt gas-fired units, and now supplies most of the Centre’s power needs.  It is expected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 1,250 tonnes of carbon dioxide per year, with savings of over $250,000 a year.
  • The Authority continued to protect and conserve Sydney Olympic Park’s wetlands and rich biodiversity, which consists of over 400 native plant species and 200 native animal species
  • Treatment capacity of the WRAMS sewerage processing plant was expanded from 2.1 to 3 megalitres per day.
  • The Blaxland Sustainable Leachate Treatment wetlands were commissioned.  This innovative bio-treatment system uses a series of wetlands and natural biological processes to break down landfill leachate into harmless substances. When fully operational, the 1,850 square metre system will divert an estimated 7-8,000 kilolitres of leachate per year for on-site treatment, resulting in significant cost and energy savings
  • Sydney Olympic Park’s Youth Eco Summit (YES) brought together approximately 6,000 students from schools from across Sydney, New South Wales and from as far afield as Alaska, Malaysia and Vanuatu to discuss sustainable outcomes and activities
  • The Authority published a new e-Book, Workbook for Managing Urban Wetlands in Australia, to provide practical aid to local, national and international professionals and students to better understand and care for freshwater and estuarine wetlands in urban environments
  • The Authority developed a new Stormwater Management & Water Sensitive Urban Design Policy; the Policy aims to promote appropriate water sensitive urban design in development, optimise local harvesting and on-site utilisation of stormwater, and ensuring proper management of stormwater from construction sites
  • Sydney Olympic Park was the venue of the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) World Parks Congress 2014.   Over 6000 delegates from more than 170 countries converged on Sydney Olympic Park for the once-every-ten-year gathering to share knowledge and set the agenda for conserving the world's natural heritage.

2013

  • The Authority’s environmental management was acknowledged at the 2013 Green Globe Awards, receiving the 10 Year Sustainability Achievement Award and the joint winner of the Public Sector Sustainability Award.
  • The Authority updated the Newington Armament Depot and Nature Reserve Conservation Management Plan, which guides the management of the Newington Armory precinct, to enhance community usage and protect the heritage and ecological value of the state significant precinct.
  • 26 stormwater litter baskets were installed into roadside drains that flow directly into local waterways.
  • The Authority is currently undertaking a public lighting energy audit for all Town Centre streets and car parks.  Data will be used to assess the outcomes of past energy efficiency initiatives and identify current priority areas for upgrades.
  • Relamping of 460 lights within the Sydney Olympic Park railway station with LED fittings.
  • Construction of a second bioremediation system to treat leachate generated by the Park's landfills.  This system will treat up to 20 kilolitres of leachate generated daily by the Blaxland Common landfill and is scheduled to commence operation in November 2013.  The Authority is responsible for the management of ten remediated landfills which together generate 60-80 megalitres of leachate per year; most of this is currently pumped off-site to a licensed liquid waste treatment plant.  The Authority¡¦s long-term goal is to sustainably treat all leachate on-site, eliminating the need for off-site treatment and disposal.  The new Blaxland bioremediation system, together with the existing Wilson park bioremediation system will together treat 16% of the Park¡¦s total leachate generation.  The system will offer a more sustainable solution to leachate treatment; utilise low energy consumption; require low maintenance; reduce the long-term reliance on off-site industrial treatment processes; provide additional wetland habitat for local flora and fauna; and offer opportunities for community and industry education on using natural biological processes to sustainable treat contaminants.
  • A contractor has been engaged to design, supply, install and maintain two 260 kilowatt cogeneration plants at the Sydney Olympic Park Aquatic Centre.  Scheduled to be operational in 2014, the plants will supply energy for water filtration, pool heating, space heating and lighting to the Aquatic Centre, with a projected savings in energy consumption of 1.8 million kilowatt hours per year and energy cost savings of $300,000 per year.
  • Development of a policy that sets out stormwater management requirements for new developments across the Park, and a stormwater management strategy for the southern catchments of the Town Centre.

2012

  • Relamping of P2 carpark - 220 lights at P2 carpark were changed from 250 watt conventional globes to 70 watt LED globes, with an anticipated energy saving of 173,000 kilowatt hours per year.  A by-product of these works is a marked gain in illumination, contributing to an improvement in visibility levels and consequently safety.
  • A new five-storey A-grade commercial building constructed by the GPT Group at 5 Murray Rose Avenue achieved a design rating of 5+ stars from the Green Building Council of Australia. The building is connected to WRAMS recycled water, utilises energy-efficient lighting and extensive solar power, and includes generous bike parking facilities for both tenants and visitors.
  • Prepared a Conservation Master Plan for the Newington Armament Depot and Nature Reserve, which it listed on the NSW State Heritage Register.
  • Design of the new three-hectare regional playground at Blaxland Riverside Park included 8,000 cubic metres of recycled sandstone; over 2,500 lineal metres of recycled hardwood timber was used to build the tree house and kiosk.
  • 48 stormwater litter baskets were installed in roadside stormwater drains that flow directly to local waterways.
  • 11,500 captive-bred endangered Green and Golden Bell frog tadpoles were released into habitat ponds in the Kronos Hill / Wentworth Common precincts to supplement frog numbers, and as part of the continuing Australian Research Council ¡Vsupported research program being conducted at the Park by the University of Newcastle and Sydney Olympic Park Authority.
  • Upgrading of the Park¡¦s sewage processing plant (part of the Water Reclamation and Management Scheme), to enable 0.8 megalitres per day more recycled water to be supplied to the Town Centre (an increase of 26%).
  • Eight boxes sized to suit the Red-rumped parrot were installed at Archery Park and Newington Armory, following sightings of this species nesting in hollows in old piers in Homebush Bay, which have since been removed.  
  • Light fittings in the main meeting rooms and the reception area of the Authority¡¦s office were changed to LEDs to reduce power use; the resultant spares will be used to replace base building lights.
  • A Noise Management Plan was developed to provide the guidelines for managing major event noise within the precinct.
  • Four buildings on the Brickpit floor associated with the former NSW State Brickworks were stabilised and weatherproofed, and public tours conducted in conjunction with World Environment Day and Threatened Species Day 2012.
  • The Authority's operational staff participated in environmental training programs in environmental legislation and due diligence, and erosion and sediment control.
  • A program of external environmental audit of the Authority's works projects was conducted. Environmental protection and pollution control practices at Authority worksites across the Park were reviewed, with feedback provided to project managers on any areas requiring improvement.
  • Four aerators were installed in Lake Belvedere to improve water quality and reduce the incidence of fishkills.
  • Awarded the Bronze Sustainability Advantage Award under the NSw Government¡¦s sustainability Advantage Program.
  • A range of high-priority energy-saving actions implemented at the Sydney Olympic park Aquatic Centre, including upgrade to Building Management Systems, review of operational schedules for lights, door seals, etc which have reduced energy consumption by 7.6% compared to the previous year.

2011

  • Alterations and improvements to the computerised operating system that controls public domain lighting, artwork lighting and ornamental fountain operation resulted in considerable energy savings.  Lights within public areas have been grouped to enable close control of operating times to suit the level of public activity in a particular place, on a particular night, at a particular time.  Lighting levels can be reduced to the minimum requirements in each individual area, depending on the events and operational needs. 
  • Changes made to timing of coach pods and car park lighting during both ¡¥event mode¡¦ and ¡¥non-event mode¡¦ have created energy savings of approximately 75kW per hour of operation.
  • New undercover spectator seating at the Wilson Park sports field reuses unwanted grandstand seating (donated by the Royal Agricultural Society of NSW), and roofing salvaged from a demolished bus shelter.
  • The Youth Eco Summit (YES) was hosted at Newington Amory in 2011 and 2012.  The event showcases student/ school achievements in sustainability, develops student leadership and engagement in sustainability, and networks schools, teachers and students with sustainability educators and agencies.  YES was delivered through the inter-agency collaboration of Sydney Olympic Park Authority, NSW Department of Education & Communities (Western Sydney Region and NSW Curriculum Learning Innovation Centre) and University of Western Sydney.  Some 2,000 students from 45 schools took part each year, while a further 1,200 students from 27 schools from across the State participated via video conference sessions. 
  • Newington Armament Depot and Nature Reserve listed on the NSW State Heritage Register.
  • Water bottle refilling stations were installed at Blaxland Riverside Park, to provide an alternative to the use of disposable plastic water bottles.
  • 200 hectares of ecologically-sensitive land was managed by contractors with bush regeneration qualifications and expertise as part of an ongoing maintenance program.  Over 10,000 hours of works were conducted in these habitats in 2011, and 32,425 new habitat plantings installed.
  • 94 volunteers from local schools, businesses and the community participated in Clean Up Australia Day, removing 228 bags (533kg) of rubbish washed into Powells Creek and Haslams Creek from upstream of the Park.
  • Solar-powered ticket dispensers installed in the Park¡¦s car parks.
  • SOPA Venues (Aquatic Centre, Athletic Centre, Sports Centre, Sports Halls and Hockey Centre) undertook a Level 2 energy audit to identify areas where energy efficiencies could be achieved.

2010

  • The Field Studies Centre underwent a major sustainability upgrade.  Environmental education programs are delivered to over 20,000 students per year from this facility.  Works included replacement of downlights with energy-efficient hanging fluorescent lights; installation of a solar hot water system; addition of skylights for natural lighting; installation of louvre windows on both sides of the building for cross-ventilation; creation of a shade wall planted with natives on the western exterior wall to protect against the afternoon sun; installation of a rainwater tank; new floor coverings comprised of wool carpet in the main area and marmoleum (made of linseed oil, wood flour and cork flour) in wet areas; and modwood seating made from recycled plastic milk bottles and non-virgin pine products.
  • The Authority's office relocation from an older warehouse-style building to a newly-constructed office block has significantly reduced the Authority¡¦s own office energy consumption.  The building achieves a 4.5 star NABERS rating (as built) and a 4 Greenstar rating from the Green Building Council of Australia.  Electricity use was further lowered by raising the temperature of the computer room by 2oC.
  • The Authority purchased 6% Greenpower each year from 2010-2013.  While this is a decrease from the 25% purchased 2003-2010, cost savings from reduced Greenpower premiums are redirected to energy efficiency programs that reduce overall energy consumption.
  • Installation of approximately 2,200 new T5 light fittings in the highest-utilised floors of the multi-deck P1 carpark in lieu of an older T8 version, have resulted in an estimated electricity reduction of 19.2 kWh or 22%, and a payback period of 4.5 years.  T8 lights on lesser-utilised floors of the carpark are being progressively replaced with T5 lights as existing lamps fail.
  • A new LED luminary was designed and developed to fit within the existing light fittings used in many of the public areas of the Park.  As part of a staged relamping program, 66 existing light fittings at Cathy Freeman Park, Station Square and the Yulang were converted to LED with an anticipated saving of 16,000 kWh of electricity per year.
  • The Olympic Cauldron at Sydney Olympic Park was listed on the NSW State Heritage Register.
  • Five fixed noise monitoring stations were installed within the Park to enable monitoring of major event noise.
  • A new Parklands Plan of Management developed and approved by the Minister.  This plan sets out the management objectives and operating regime for the parklands.
  • Electrical components of the irrigation pumping system within Narawang Wetland were upgraded to enable continuation of the cyclic draining program for control of the predatory fish Gambusia holbrooki.
  • 13 specially-designed bat roost boxes were installed to provide habitat for microbats.
  • Ecological interpretive signs were installed across the Park.
  • A new and larger litter collection crate was installed at the Haslams Creek stormwater litter boom.  A greater quantity of water-borne litter and debris entering the Park from upstream is now captured; overtopping of the boom and subsequent smothering of saltmarsh and mangrove habitats now occurs less frequently.
  • Successful bioremediation trials of Blaxland common leachate indicated the potential viability of a biological treatment strategy.
  • A substantial infestation of the noxious aquatic weed Salvinia molesta was eliminated from Lake Belvedere.
  • A pedestrian and cycle movement study was undertaken to evaluate the future needs of Park residents and workers.  Study results will assists in reducing short trip car dependency and the carbon footprint generated by travel within the Town Centre.
  • The Authority revised its Pesticide Use and Notification Plan.
  • Recycle stone was incorporated into the landscaping of the newly-built Stockroute Park.  This trachyte stone was originally salvaged from the NSW State Abattoir stockyards and has been used to face new perimeter seating walls. 
  • A new development at 8 Australia Avenue provides office space for approximately 500 staff.  The building has a 4-star Green Building Council of Australia rating and a 4.5 star NABERS energy rating.  Sustainability features include includes connection to recycled water, energy-efficient design and tinted glazing.
  • New signage installed within the public domain contain recycled aluminium.
  • Park furniture made from wood composites was field-trialled in the Park¡¦s picnic grounds. This furniture, made from wood waste fibre mixed with recycled HDPE from plastic milk bottles is promoted as am alternative to hardwood with no need for painting or oiling.
  • Appendices of the Authority¡¦s annual report were released in digital format rather than printed within the report in 2010 and 2011, saving an average of 50 pages per report in print runs of 500.

2009

  • The Authority signs up for the NSW Government's Sustainability Advantage Program and agrees to become a cluster leader for businesses within the Sydney Olympic Park area.
  • Construction of a new rock-ramp fish ladder between Lake Belvedere and Boundary Creek, to restore the natural aquatic connection between estuarine and freshwater ecosystems, enhancing habitat for native fish.  This project was conducted in partnership with the Sydney Metropolitan Catchment Management Authority and NSW Department of Primary Industries.
  • Sydney Olympic Park was recognised as a leader in best-practice management of the endangered Green and Golden Bell Frog and the Coastal Saltmarsh endangered ecological community by the NSW Department of Environment and Climate Change threatened species demonstration site project.  The project provided funding for new interpretive signage at Sydney Olympic Park, the development of best practice management guidelines aimed at other land managers, and information brochures targeted at the local community.
  • Recycled brick paving is a design feature of the new Jacaranda Park.
  • Opening of the new 5-star Pullman Hotel ¡V the hotel has a 50% target for water conservation and will use 40% less energy than most equivalent 5-star hotels.  Its roof-mounted solar hot water array delivers hot water to the Pullman and to other Accor Group hotels located nearby.
  • Recognition of Sydney Olympic Park as one of the top 25 outstanding ecological restoration projects in Australasia by the Global Restoration Network.
  • Bicentennial marker was landscaped with 30,990 native grasses which will not require irrigation once established.
  • Recognition of Sydney Olympic Park as one of the ten most significant wildlife habitats in Sydney by the NSW Department of Environment and Climate Change.
  • Continuation of a program to install water metres in existing water infrastructure systems to enable measurement of water use by individual components.  Installation of individual meters in the Park¡¦s many water features and ornamental fountains allowed subsequent detection and repair of leaks, and led to changes to operating hours to maximise efficiencies.  Meters were also installed on the harvested stormwater network to enable monitoring of volumes used.
  • Audits of the Park¡¦s electrical infrastructure were conducted with Energy Australia and electrical engineers to identify areas of high energy usage and to install energy meters that can be read in real time to assess peak energy use, including during major events.
  • A subsurface irrigation system was installed as part of upgrade works to the Wilson Park playing fields, and uses 70-80% less water than the previous surface irrigation system.  The Park¡¦s irrigation network was also extended to connect Wilson Park to the harvested stormwater supply, eliminating the use of potable water for field irrigation.
  • Design of the new Sydney Olympic Park Visitor¡¦s Centre and Armory Wharf Café to maximise natural ventilation and remove the need for air conditioning.
  • Four new stormwater litter booms were added to the existing eight at creeks around the Park to capture stormwater litter and prevent it travelling further downstream.
  • Two hectares of coastal saltmarsh have been re-established on the banks of Haslams Creek following rehabilitation works.  Works involved ripping the poor-quality substrate, incorporating mulch to improve soil quality, and allowing natural recolonisation.
  • Water supply to constructed frog breeding ponds in the Brickpit and Kronos Hill/Wentworth Common areas was automated to reduce labour costs and increase reliability of water levels throughout the frog breeding season.
  • Public bicycle racks were installed outside new office developments and shops in Dawn Fraser Avenue.
  • A new Remediated Lands Management Plan was developed and approved by the regulatory authority.  
  • An aerator was installed in the Bicentennial Park leachate Pond to increase evaporation rates and thereby decrease the volume of leachate requiring removal to an off-site treatment facility.
  • Erosion rectification works were conducted at Woo-la-ra.
  • New Commonwealth Bank of Australia offices opened - providing office space for 3500 personnel achives a base NABERS rating of 5 stars and a certified 5 star rating under the green star office design.  Design includes passive chilled beams throughout the office.
  • The Authority becomes a cluster leader in the Sustainability Advantage program, encouraging businesses around the Park to embrace environmental sustainability.
  • A three-year staged Juncus acutus weed removal program was completed at Badu mangroves, resulting in the complete removal of large stands of this species from endangered saltmarsh vegetation.
  • Inaugural 'Life in the Park' event is held, where survey volunteers and the community are invited to attend an afternoon of short talks on the biodiversity of Sydney Olympic Park, and the results of monitoring programs conducted throughout the past year. The program has been conducted in September each year since 2009.

2008

  • Environmental Guidelines for Sydney Olympic Park revised and formally adopted.  
  • A team of post-doctoral, postgraduate and undergraduate students commenced a five-year comprehensive research project entitled: ¡¥Building sound ecological restoration strategies for endangered amphibians¡¦. The Australian Research Council Linkage project is targeting the endangered Green and Golden bell frog, and is being undertaken by the Authority and the University of Newcastle, in partnership with the University of Sydney, the South Australian Museum, Strathfield Council, the Roads and Traffic Authority, and the Office of Environment and Heritage. 
  • GPT Group was awarded the 2008 Urban Taskforce Development Award for Commercial development for its Sydney Olympic Park Quad Business Park.  Quad 4 was the first speculative office in NSW to achieve a 5-Star Green Star Design, incorporating chilled beams, waterless urinals, sun-shading devices and double-glazed windows.
  • The Authority introduced a water-free system of washing its fleet vehicles¡V a special polish is used to remove dirt form vehicles instead of water.
  • A Biodiversity Management Plan was developed to guide conservation management of the Park's ecological assets.
  • Over 800 square metres of new permeable pavers were installed in the Town Centre, adding to those previously installed.  These pavers enable stormwater infiltration for watering of street trees and reduce stormwater runoff.

2007

  • A solar-powered tidal gate was installed in the Waterbird Refuge to allow daily exchange of tides between the wetland and the Parramatta River estuary.  These works were undertaken to improve the water quality of the 25 hectare saltwater wetland and strengthen ecological diversity, particularly for internationally-migratory shorebirds. 
  • Schools from disadvantaged areas in western and south-western Sydney were able to participate in the Park¡¦s environmental education programs as a result of a partnership between Sydney Olympic Park Authority and Transurban.  300 students from 52 schools participated in the program.
  • A partnership between Energy Australia and Sydney Olympic Park Authority transformed a former ammunition storehouse located within the Newington Armory heritage precinct into a new renewable energy education centre for school students.
  • A new adventure playground opens at Wentworth Common, above a remediated landfill.  The Park includes sculptures made from sandstone recovered from beneath the Brickpit water storage reservoir.

2006

  • A suite of buildings within the Newington Armory heritage precinct were restored and opened for adaptive re-use as a student accommodation lodge, operated by the YMCA.
  • The Authority successfully negotiated with public transport authorities for more bus routes and increased service frequency, to serve the Park¡¦s growing daily workforce.
  • Vegetation and landscape management plans were prepared for 11 parklands precincts identified as having significant ecological values or containing threatened species habitats.
  • Extensive primary vegetation management works were undertaken within Newington Nature Reserve to address mangrove incursion into endangered Coastal Saltmarsh ecological community.  Approximately 12,000 mangrove saplings to 1.5 metres high were removed from identified saltmarsh and mudflat conservation areas.  Saltmarsh rapidly recolonised rehabilitated areas, and annual seedling removal has continued to be implemented to conserve the saltmarsh community.
  • Initiation of a long-term invasive and noxious weed removal and habitat replacement strategy in the Brickpit, targeting mature stands of lantana, pampas grass, and spiny rush.  In six years, more than 6,000 square metres of lantana has been removed and over 42,000 habitat replacement plantings installed.

2005

  • The Park's recycled water distribution network was extended between 2005-2007, thereby permitting existing commercial buildings in the Australia Centre, Sydney Olympic Park Hockey Centre and Sydney Olympic Park Aquatic and Athletics Centre to connect to the recycled water supply.  This project is estimated to have saved approximately 260 megalitres of potable water annually.
  • Upgrade and expansion of the water Park¡¦s recycled water plant to increase production of recycled water.  Construction of a second sewer mining pump station in the southern part of the park to increase the supply of sewage and enable increased production of recycled water (2005-7).
  • Connection of the Sydney Olympic Park Ferry Wharf irrigation system to harvested stormwater supply.
  • The Brickpit Ringwalk opens, providing Park visitors with access to the Brickpit from a 550 metre circular walkway 18 metres above the Brickpit floor, while preserving the habitat of the endangered Green and Golden Bell frog below.
  • Sydney Olympic Park hosts the Houses of the Future exhibition, showcasing award-winning examples of environmental innovation and sustainable design and materials.
  • A former munitions storage building within the Newington Armory heritage precinct is restored and adaptively re-used as an art gallery.

2004

  • Sydney Olympic Park awarded an Energy Australia ¡V National Trust Heritage Award for tourism programs promoting the cultural heritage of the former Royal Australian Navy Armament Depot at Newington.  This historic former naval site was opened to the public for the first time in 2004.
  • The Authority developed cycling routes, tours, maps and a bike hire facility, promoting cycling as a sustainable mode of transportation to and within the Park.
  • The Authority developed a photographic catalogue of more than 1300 items of moveable heritage at Newington Armory, as the basis for a curatorial management plan.
  • Reduction in operating times of public fountains to lower water losses through evaporation; Reprogramming of landscape irrigation times to reduce recycled water demand.
  • Ornamental fountains originally connected to potable water were changed to recycled water following NSW Health approval of this use.
  • Recycled water supply was extended across Powells Creek into the eastern section of Bicentennial Park, for use in irrigation and public toilets.
  • 20,000 grasses and sedges were planted to enhance habitat for the Green and Golden Bell Frog and migratory Latham¡¦s Snipe, as well as other species utilising grassy habitats.

2003

  • Sydney Olympic Park Authority became the first large-scale precinct in Australia to mandate a minimum 4 Green Stars (equivalent to Best Practice), under the Green Building Council Australia¡¦s environmental design rating tool, for all new commercial developments.
  • From 2003-2010, the Authority purchased 25% of its electricity requirements as Greenpower. 
  • A cyclic draining program was trialled in some of the 22 frog habitat ponds of Narawang Wetland to control the pest fish Gambusia holbrooki, which predates on endangered Green and Golden Bell Frog tadpoles.  The program proved successful and has since continued to be implemented annually, with a different subset of ponds drained each year.
  • The Authority developed comprehensive website information on sustainable transport modes to get to and from Sydney Olympic Park.
  • The River Walk and Louise Sauvage Pathway were opened to the public, adding 6.5 kilometres of public pathway and cycleway, including 2.3 kilometres of Parramatta River foreshore and links to regional cycleways.
  • The historic light rail system at Newington Armory was restored to become a visitor transportation system, showcasing the natural and cultural heritage of the area (now listed on the NSW State Heritage Register).  The rail system was formerly used for munitions transport between the wharf, laboratories and storage buildings.  Works involved extensive repair and relaying of track beds and points along the 6.7km network, laying new rail to form a circuit, upgrading engines and commissioning passenger carriages. 
  • 38 bat and bird breeding boxes were installed around the Park, to compensate for the lack of hollows in the newly planted immature landscapes.  Fauna habitat was also enhanced by installing 7,500 grasses, 10,000 shrubs and 15,000 trees.